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The Life of Gouverneur Morris

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CHAPTER II.

Political state of the American Colonies at the opening of the Revolution.-Organization of the first forms of Government.--Committees of the people.-First Provincial Convention and Congress of New York.--Modes of election.-Part taken by Mr. Morris in the first Congress.--Aspect of political opinions in the Congress and in the Colony.--Means of raising money.--Mr. Morris's plan.

We are now coming to a period in Mr. Morris’s life, when we can begin to trace his progress with more distinctness and precision.  The great event of a final separation between the British government and the colonies was now approaching, and he was destined to act a commanding part in the drama that followed.  We have found him writing to his friend, that he ‘disliked politics,’ little anticipating probably that this dislike would be so soon conquered, and that a large portion of his future life would be passed amidst the most stirring scenes of political change and excitement.  Whatever may have been the impressions of his youth, or the bias of his opinions in the incipient stages of the threatening storm, he betrayed no hesitancy when the crisis came, but united promptly and cordially with the supporters of his country’s claims, and from that moment to the end of the contest he stood in the front ranks of those most distinguished for their patriotism, fortitude, and constancy.

The American colonies, during the three first years of the revolution, presented a phenomenon in the political world, of which there is no example in the history of nations.  Twelve governments, which had hitherto existed independent of each other, and alike subordinate to a superior power, all at once and as if by common consent, threw off their allegiance to tha


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From The Life of Gouverneur Morris: With Selections from His Correspondence and Miscellaneous Papers; Detailing Events in the American Revolution, The French Revolution, and in the Political History of the United States, by Jared Sparks, Volume 1, Boston: Gray & Bowen, 1832, p 28. Some minor edits may have been made, but an attempt has been made to preserve the original spelling. Although some effort has been made to correct the limitations of OCR technology, if you find an error please report it to jvinci@colonialhall.com.

 
 


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